Trembling But Not Sure What’s Different

Written by Jim Folk
Last updated January 20, 2022

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Video Transcript

I’ve had internal trembling for about two months after a bad anxiety crash. It happens in the early morning (4 AM) and makes it impossible to fall back to sleep. I’ve done a lot better with anxiety in the past month or so and mentally feel like I was before the crash. I’ve felt like the internal trembling is not as severe at times, but sometimes it still feels severe. I don’t understand what I’m doing differently because it isn’t always more severe on days my stress is elevated. Any advice on this?

First, trembling is a common indication of hyperstimulation. It can occur anytime during the day and more often after the body has had some rest, such as after sleeping.

Many anxious and stressed people notice their hyperstimulation symptoms increase after the body has had some rest, such as from sleep.

That used to occur to me a lot during my struggle with anxiety and when I’ve let stress elevate higher than I usually let it.

So, trembling after a few hours of sleep is a common indication of hyperstimulation. The higher the degree of hyperstimulation, the more pronounced the symptoms.

Second, as long as the body is hyperstimulated, even to a slight degree, it can present symptoms of any type, number, intensity, duration, frequency, and at any time, especially after the body has had some rest.

Since hyperstimulation can cause the body to act erratically due to Nervous System Excitation and Dysregulation, Homeostatic Dysregulation, and involuntary Hormone Changes, it’s common not to see a distinct pattern of when or why symptoms appear.

While we can often see a stress-symptom relationship when stress is greatly elevated, the pattern becomes more obscure with lesser degrees of stress.

So, it’s not uncommon to have a spike in hyperstimulation symptoms for no reason, especially when stress hasn’t changed.

This is a very common phenomenon when the body becomes hyperstimulated.

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And as long as the body is hyperstimulated, even to a slight degree, it can act erratically and at any time.

In this case, my advice is to continue to work at your recovery, especially Level Two recovery, so that your body isn’t incurring stress from your behavior, and then let your body recover in time.

As your body recovers from hyperstimulation, it will stop sending symptoms, including after resting, such as from a few hours of sleep.

As your body recovers from hyperstimulation and stabilizes, it will stop producing symptoms no matter how much rest or sleep you get. Then you’ll know your body has made good progress in eliminating hyperstimulation.

Recovery Support members can read more about hyperstimulation-caused Nervous System Excitation and Dysregulation, Homeostatic Dysregulation, and involuntary Hormone Changes and how they can affect the body in chapter 14.

The combination of good self-help information and working with an experienced anxiety disorder therapist, coach, or counselor is the most effective way to address anxiety and its many symptoms. Until the core causes of anxiety are addressed – which we call the underlying factors of anxiety – a struggle with anxiety unwellness can return again and again. Dealing with the underlying factors of anxiety is the best way to address problematic anxiety.

Additional Resources

Return to our Anxiety Frequent Questions archive.

anxietycentre.com: Information, support, and therapy for anxiety disorder and its symptoms, including this Frequently Asked Anxiety Question.