Pain

Written by Jim Folk
Last updated August 5, 2021

Pain stresses the body.[1][2][3] As such, pain, especially chronic pain, can stress the body sufficiently to cause mild degrees of hyperstimulation and aggravate existing hyperstimulation.

If you are experiencing anxiety disorder or hyperstimulation and its symptoms, having to deal with pain, especially chronic pain, can aggravate anxiety, hyperstimulation and their symptoms.

Addressing the pain can reduce stress and its impact on anxiety, hyperstimulation, and their symptoms.

Moreover, pain can also disrupt relaxation and sleep. This disruption can also stress the body due to the increase in stress hormones caused by a reduction in rest and sleep.

In some cases, pain relievers can be used to reduce pain so that the stress coming from pain can also be reduced. For more information, talk with your doctor about ways to manage pain.

The combination of good self-help information and working with an experienced anxiety disorder therapist, coach, or counselor is the most effective way to address anxiety and its many symptoms. Until the core causes of anxiety are addressed – which we call the underlying factors of anxiety – a struggle with anxiety unwellness can return again and again. Dealing with the underlying factors of anxiety is the best way to address problematic anxiety.

Additional Resources

Return to our anxiety disorders signs and symptoms page.

anxietycentre.com: Information, support, and therapy for anxiety disorder and its symptoms, including .

References

  1. Abdallah, Chadi G, and Paul Geha. “Chronic Pain and Chronic Stress: Two Sides of the Same Coin?” Advances in Pediatrics., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5546756/.
  1. Bleakman, D, et al. “Glutamate Receptors and Pain.” Advances in Pediatrics., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17110139.
  1. Chapman, C. Richard, et al. “Pain and Stress in a Systems Perspective Reciprocal Neural, Endocrine and Immune Interactions.” Advances in Pediatrics., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2278005/.