Feel Wrong, Odd, Strange – anxiety symptoms

Written by Jim Folk
Medically reviewed by Marilyn Folk, BScN.
Last updated May 19, 2021

feel wrong odd strange anxiety symptoms

Feeling like there is someting wrong, odd, or strange about how you feel is a common sign and symptom of anxiety, anxiety disorder, and anxiety and panic attacks.

This article explains the relationship between anxiety and feeling like there is something wrong, odd, or strange about how you feel.

Feel wrong, odd, and strange anxiety symptoms common descriptions:

You, or parts of you, feel wrong, different, foreign, odd, or strange. It could be your entire being or body, one part of or spot on the body (such as an arm, leg, foot, hand, finger, cheek, lip, tongue, or any other part or spot on the body), or any portion thereof.

This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom can persistently affect one area only, can shift and affect another area or areas, and can migrate all over and affect many areas over and over again.

This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom can come and go rarely, occur frequently, or persist indefinitely. For example, you may feel a pins and needles feeling once in a while and not that often, feel it off and on, or feel it all the time.

This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom may precede, accompany, or follow an escalation of other anxiety sensations and symptoms, or occur by itself.

This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom can precede, accompany, or follow an episode of nervousness, anxiety, fear, and elevated stress, or occur ‘out of the blue’ and for no apparent reason.

This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom can range in intensity from slight, to moderate, to severe. It can also come in waves, where it’s strong one moment and eases off the next.

This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom can change from day to day, and/or from moment to moment.

All of the above combinations and variations are common.

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What causes the feel wrong, odd, strange anxiety symptom?

Apprehensive behavior, which creates anxiety, causes the body to produce the stress response (also known as the fight or flight response).[1][2] The stress response stresses the body. When the body becomes chronically stressed, which we call stress-response hyperstimulation, the body can exhibit a wide variety of odd and unusual sensations and symptoms.[3][4] This feel wrong, odd, strange symptom is one of them.

How to get rid of the feel wrong, odd, strange anxiety symptom?

Because this feel wrong, odd, strange symptom is just a symptom of chronic stress, it needn't be a cause for concern. It will subside when you reduce your stress and give your body sufficient time to recover from the adverse effects of chronic stress.

As your body's stress returns to a healthy level, symptoms of stress subside, including the feel wrong, odd, strange anxiety symptom. Therefore, this feel wrong, odd, strange symptom needn't be a cause for concern.

For a more detailed explanation about all anxiety symptoms, including this one, why symptoms can persist long after the stress response has ended, common barriers to recovery and symptom elimination, and more recovery strategies and tips, we have many chapters that address this information in the Recovery Support area of our website.

The combination of good self-help information and working with an experienced anxiety disorder therapist, coach, or counselor is the most effective way to address anxiety and its many symptoms. Until the core causes of anxiety are addressed – which we call the underlying factors of anxiety – a struggle with anxiety unwellness can return again and again. Dealing with the underlying factors of anxiety is the best way to address problematic anxiety.

Additional Resources

Return to our anxiety disorders signs and symptoms page.

anxietycentre.com: Information, support, and therapy for anxiety disorder and its symptoms, including the Feel Wrong, Odd, Strange anxiety symptoms.

References

1. Selye, H. (1956). The stress of life. New York, NY, US: McGraw-Hill.

2. Folk, Jim and Folk, Marilyn. “The Stress Response And Anxiety Symptoms.” anxietycentre.com, August 2019.

3. Hannibal, Kara E., and Mark D. Bishop. “Chronic Stress, Cortisol Dysfunction, and Pain: A Psychoneuroendocrine Rationale for Stress Management in Pain Rehabilitation.” Advances in Pediatrics., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2014.

4. Justice, Nicholas J., et al. “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Like Induction Elevates β-Amyloid Levels, Which Directly Activates Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Neurons to Exacerbate Stress Responses.” Journal of Neuroscience, Society for Neuroscience, 11 Feb. 2015.